HBCU Baseball’s Top Catchers with Cannons for Arms

Watching a runner take off during the pitcher’s windup attempting a stolen base is one of the most exciting plays in baseball. Normally this brings you to the edge of your seat. Both the player and the ball are headed for the same place, but the winner in this race depends on precision, speed, and split-second timing. Most notability we’re speaking of a catcher with a cannon of a rifle…his arm.

A catcher’s ability to control theft from station to station on the diamond is largely considered the position’s most valuable skill. But should they get all the credit, if any credit at all for a caught steal?

Now, conventional baseball knowledge suggests that once the base runner reaches base it becomes the task of the catcher to limit the stolen base and throw out any attempts of a would-be base stealer. After all, the scenario ends up in the box score the next day as a caught stealing by the catcher, suggesting that all the credit is for the catcher and the throw.

Black College Nines (BCN) takes a look at the HBCU baseball top catcher’s and their ability to throw out would be base-stealers.

Catcher statistical information based on the 2020 shortened season.

Top HBCU Baseball Catchers limiting the running game:

Ryne Stanley (North Carolina A&T University) Stanley should be known for his advanced defensive abilities. He’s a natural receiver that regularly steals strikes on the corners and is quick to release the baseball. Absolute bazooka for an arm. Was one of the few catchers in HBCU Baseball last season to call his own game. Top grade (62) percent of base thieves thrown out in 2020.

 

 


Jeff Rodriguez (Jackson State University) Physical frame and athleticism plays, big impacts to all fields, sound receiver with his rocket arm. He threw out an impressive (58) percent of would be attempted to steal. Grade Stats – SBA(17), CSB(10)

 

 

 


Josue Sanchez (Florida Memorial University) Big arm strength and power potential. Keeps the running game in check with strong arm throwing out (53) percent of base stealers and continuing to show the raw tools to be a standout defender.

 

 

 


Jacob Bisharat (Miles College) Good receiver and signal caller. Can hit for power does the intangibles that don’t always make the stats. Good receiving ability with an quick release for an arm and the ball simply explodes out of his hand. Nailed 33 percent of attempted base stealers.

 

 

 


Kyle Jenkins (Alcorn State University) Jenkins gets high marks for his leadership and ability to call a game. He has an easy plus arm that has been his calling card in the SWAC. Grade a (.979) fielding percentage, (29) percent base runners thief gunned down.

 

 

 


Rob McGhee (Tuskegee University) is a defensive guy that not only gives Tuskegee a great opportunity to slow down the running game but he is what head coach Reginald Hollins calls “a goalie behind the dish.” With a rocket arm and stellar receiving skills, he’s arguably the best defensive catching prospect in HBCU Baseball. Has a bat to boot. Grade (.1000) fielding percentage, (27) percent of base stealers caught.

 

 


Ty Hanchey (Norfolk State University) He’s an improving defender and he should have no trouble sticking behind the plate, albeit with an offensive-minded profile. Gets high marks for his leadership and ability to call a game. He has an easy strong arm that has been his calling card in the MEAC since his arrival on campus. Grade (.943) fielding percentage, (27) percent of base stealers nailed.

 

 


Hunter May (Alabama State University) May offers three plus tools as a catcher. His power, arm and defense. He could be solid in all three areas, according to his coaching staff, stands out with his work behind the plate. Issue is he platoons behind the plate. Grade thrown out (27) percent of would be stealers once inserted in a game.

 

 


Honorable Mention:

Gavin Sloan (Albany State University)

Turner Davis (Savannah State University)

Senior Tyler Gordon (Prairie View A&M University)

Ben Avila (Grambling State University)

Jeff Rodriguez (Jackson State University)

 

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